Posted by: marthabernie | June 25, 2015

UNCLE WALTER TWEDDELL – 1930’s

scan0098I came across the obituary that was written when my great uncle, Walter Tweddell, died in 1940.  It is a handwritten document rather than what appeared in the newspaper, and as you can see, it was written in the older style where much information was given about the person’s character and personality.  Above is Uncle Walter sitting on the steps of their home in Highland Park with step daughter Ednah in the middle, and wife Anna (Aunt Annie) on the right.  The house behind them and the larger building on the corner were torn down in the 50’s or 60’s and shops were put in.  The house at 116 S. Avenue 63, however, still stands, though it has changed dramatically for the worse over the years.  Here is the obituary written by “M.V.E” whose initials I do not recognize.

WALTER TWEDDELL

Walter Tweddell was born June 25, 1871 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and passed away February 14, 1940 at 2:45 P.M.  His father was John Tweddell and was born in Newcastle, England and his mother was Eliza J. Tweddell.  His mother was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, too, as well as his three sisters and seven brothers.  He was one of eleven children.  His brothers were Harry, George, Milton, John Jr., Elmer, Herbert and Charles.  His sisters were Bertha, Maggie and Lida.  His boyhood was spent in and around Pittsburgh and his young manhood was spent traveling around in the east following the construction trade.  About 34 years ago Walter started toward California and arrived in San Francisco in 1906, soon after the San Francisco fire.  Three months later he came to Los Angeles, where he remained until the time of his death.  He was employed as the head electrical worker in the Southern Pacific Railroad Shops for thirty three years until his retirement on May 28, 1938.

For the past eighteen years Walter has lived in his home in Highland Park at 116 South Avenue 63.  On November 15, 1923 he was married to Anna Laura Faulkner Tweddell who survives him.  For almost seventeen years they lived as man and wife in a beautiful companionship.  There was an understanding rarely found between two people.  He was dearly beloved by all those who knew him and was affectionately called “Daddy” Tweddell by those who were near to him.  He lived a very active and strenuous life, working constantly around his home and in his garden.  His yard and his flowers were his hobby as long as he lived.

Eleven months ago Walter Tweddell was stricken with a paralysis of the throat, brought on by a tumor at the base of his brain.  Through all his suffering he was brave and he carried a beautiful psychology of Life and Living with him into the beyond.  He passed away very quietly in a peaceful sleep with his wife Anna by his bedside.

He was preceded in death by his mother, father, two brothers and a sister.  He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, Anna L. Tweddell, three step children, O.L. Faulkner and Ednah Lewis of San Francisco and Mrs. Ethyl Rodgers of Spokane, Washington, two sisters, Mrs. Bertha Megill of Monaca Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Lida Beagley of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, and five brothers – Charles Tweddell of Fellows California, Harry Tweddell of Lincoln Place, Pennsylvania, Herbert Tweddell of Beaver Falls Pennsylvania, Elmer Tweddell and Milton Tweddell, both of Los Angeles, and many relatives and friends.  M.V.E.

I am hoping that by posting this information, a Tweddell descendent will get in touch with me.


Responses

  1. I’m afraid I can’t help you with Tweddell information, but I enjoyed your post. I wonder what your uncle’s ‘beautiful psychology of Life and Living ‘ was. It’s a lovely phrase.

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    • I can’t give any further enlightenment other than to say that Aunt Annie and Uncle Walter were “like lovebirds” together according to my mother and aunts, and that he appears to have been a kind and considerate person, well regarded by all who met him. Unfortunately, he died long before I was born, and I only vaguely remember Aunt Annie as I was very small when she died.

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