Posted by: marthabernie | April 30, 2018

GREAT GRANDMOTHER MARLIN – An Update from AncestryDNA.com

JJ Marlin Family, Lunda Carrie Hall Marlin, Walter Elbert Marlin, Webster County Missouri, Marlin Family MO

ANOTHER UPDATE (4-30-18):  Since receiving the DNA information four years ago, I have been in contact with a  cousin in Missouri who connected through a sister of my grandfather, Elbert (seated front row left end).  Two sisters married into the McNabb family and their descendants still live in the area.  Clarification on Lundy’s story is that she was sent to live with her uncle and aunt when her father died and her mother had no means to care for her.  She had a half sister and some half brothers, so most of the story has a ring of truth, but the part about being Cherokee Indian still remains false.

I have been happy to connect with unknown cousins through Ancestry DNA, though some people have found some surprises and some sad stories.  The whole DNA thing amazes me—just look at the way the Golden State Murderer was apprehended this past week through a DNA trace…this after more than 40 years.

22014:  I posted this photo quite some time ago and as you can see below, the family story was always that Great Grandmother Carrie Lunda Hall Marlin, was part Cherokee Indian.  She was adopted by the Hall family after becoming orphaned, and there was another girl, also an adopted orphan.  I am not sure how the story got started that “Lundy” was part Indian, but by the time I came along, it was repeated as fact.  Maybe it was because of her high, wide forehead…maybe it was because there were other orphaned kids who were part Cherokee….

Well, in  December I sent in a DNA sample to AncestryDNA.com, and guess what?  NO NATIVE AMERICAN DNA anywhere…zero, zilch, nothing.  This also debunks the story that my fourth great grandfather, Eli McManus, married a Choctow woman and had four children.

More on the DNA results in upcoming posts.  No surprises, but it did confirm that I am related to the one ancestor that we’ve never been able to document.  If you have been considering doing the Ancestry DNA, don’t put it off.  The test for women has been expanded, and the cost has gone down to $99 plus shipping.  The results also connect you with people who have similar DNA, with their contact information if they wish to be contacted.  See more about the James Jones Marlin family and Carrie Lunda Hall Marlin below.

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This is a photo taken about 1893-1895 of my great grandparents, James Jones and Carrie Lunda (Hall) Marlin, and their family.  That is my grandfather, Walter Elbert Marlin seated on the front left.  Don’t you love the collar to his shirt?  This was before the family was completed.  The baby seated on my great grandmother’s lap was baby Orville.  Son Scott had not been born at this point.  I would have to go back through family records to name all the girls, but Helen was the eldest, standing in the middle, and the twins, Nell and Belle, standing on either side of her (note one appears much taller than the other).   I think daughter Lina is seated on my great grandfather’s lap.

The oral history of the family contends that Carrie Lunda Hall was adopted by the Hall family, and that she was part Cherokee Indian.  Like in so many cases, she did not go by her first name, she was always known as Lundy.  I am thinking of having my DNA examined through Ancestry.com to see if any American Indian actually turns up!  She lived to be 97 years old and I remember her vividly.  She lived with one of her twin daughters in Torrance, California, and every time I saw her, she was seated with a blanket over her legs.  She also occasionally smoked a corn cob pipe!  I remember seeing her do it, but unfortunately, there are no photos.  She died in 1957 and is buried with her husband in the Marlin Cemetery near Conway, Missouri.  James Jones Marlin was the twin of Jesse Hollis Marlin, and since he died before I was born, I never met him and I don’t know much about him.  Jessee Hollis Marlin is also buried in the Marlin Cemetery.


Responses

  1. Great picture

    Like

  2. Fantastic picture, what a treasure. I am in the process of having my DNA tested and hoping to connect to family in the US (I’m in England). I love hearing stories like this, where connections are made or not, because either result is just as valuable! Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  3. My hubby Laurie Marlin and his cousins have a lot dna matches with Marlin/Ferrier in their tree. He has testedvon Ancestry.

    Like


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